May 2014 update from the CIO

We made it!  Commencement was great, congratulations to all new graduates.caps

Summer is a time for projects for CIS and we went full steam ahead starting on Monday May 19th.

Electronic Billing
We plan to roll out paperless billing starting July 1.  Bills will be presented via the Portal, where the College already accepts payments. This Portal improvement has many beneficial side effects, and not just for those paying bills.  It removes a lot of tedious printing and scanning of paper bills (which were the hybrid by product of a pre-printed form and an electronic source) and eliminates the cost of mailing out the bills.  I’d like to thank Patricia Wang and Scott Martin for their patient help with reaching this goal.

IAM@HMC
Last week, we took a step in the IAM@HMC project that had the effect of synchronizing people’s passwords over a number of systems. This passed unnoticed for most people, but is a prerequisite for steps we are taking over the next few weeks.  In preparation for paperless billing which starts on July 1, we are adding people to the JICS portal this week and bringing portal single sign on live.  Next week, we’ll be creating accounts for incoming students.  There is a lot of complexity to single sign on, but hopefully most of it is hidden from your view.  One thing to note is that the interaction between systems and the identity provider will often have the result that the only way to fully log out of a particular application is to close your browser.  We look forward to hearing and reading your reaction to this stage of the IAM@HMC project.  For more information, see the new IT Mattters section of our website.

Parsons Rewiring
The work began on time May 19th. As I mentioned last time, in tandem with the vacated space project we are rewiring all of Parsons (east and west). The contractors will be pulling 1,900 cables out of the conduit, and we’ll rewire with less than half that number. We’re setting things up for a high traffic  “converged network” that can carry video, VOIP phone traffic and all the traditional network traffic. We are placing more than 70 wireless access points in the building (before there were 9) and are consolidating the distribution switches. The cabling infrastructure will be capable of supporting 10Gb to the desktop, should the College want to do that in the future.

Engineering Department VDI Project
We’ve begun a fascinating exploration of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) with an Engineering Department Project that contemplates replacing the Engineering Computing Facility (ECF) with a central service that can be reached from anywhere but provides the same tools, such as SolidWorks and ModelSim. Two of our summer employees, Graham Gordon and Minh Triet Nguyen, are helping Prof David Money Harris to examine solutions like Citrix XenDesktop, VMWare, Apache VCL and Microsoft DV. We hope to have an extended pilot available for testing by students in the Fall. 

Reorganization in CIS
We have made a small reorganization within CIS, which allows us to achieve two goals: first, broaden the base of audiovisual support for classes and events; second, focus more on Educational Technology.  We’ve moved support for AV back into the User Support Group, led by Cindy Abercrombie, and sharpened the focus in the newly named Educational Technology Services, led by Elizabeth Hodas. Elizabeth has written a more detailed article about these changes to Audiovisual and Educational Technology Support.

CMC Course Schedule Discontinued
Many faculty and students were used to using the CMC “Classic” Course Schedule, which was linked from our Portal.  It used some older Jenzabar technology, but many liked how it laid out the course areas. In mid-May, a security problem came to light.  It had to do with scripts that were potentially subject to SQL injection.  Among other things, this meant that CMC had to remove the old course schedule from their site.  It won’t be coming back, as it was built on a version of the portal technology for which Jenzabar discontinued support some time ago.  The newer course search has the same course areas, but they are listed in a drop down box. CMC and Pomona conveyed their apologies for these sudden changes, but the security issues overrode other concerns.

Employee Anniversaries
At the annual staff lunch on May 19th, three CIS staff received service awards:

  • Jeho Park, Scientific Computing Specialist (5 years)
  •  Pete Sanchez, Technical Analyst (15 years)
  • Roger Wiechman, Network Manager (20 years)

Collectively, that’s 40 years of service to the HMC Community.  Thank you, Jeho, Pete and Roger.

Summer Learning Community: Google Apps for Education.
When Debra Mashek proposed setting up a learning community on the topic of Google Apps in Education, we were delighted at CIS.  We have regularly received feedback and requests for additional information about the many features of Google Apps for Education that are available via g.hmc.edu.  We do not see ourselves as the experts on this complex topic, but as “accomplished novices” who want to learn alongside you. “Learning Community” seems like exactly the right way to go. Fourteen people have signed up and the groups start meeting this week on Thursday and Friday at 11am.  It’s not too late to join us.

Learn a little more about this, and reach the sign up form, in the article on the Google Apps Learning Community.

That’s it for the May 2014 update. Make sure you’re enjoying the summer, and gather ye rosebuds while ye may, old time is still a flyin.

April 2014 Update from the CIO

As we round the corner into the home stretch and everyone’s focus is on those last few weeks of the Spring Semester, I hope you can take a moment to read the news from CIS.

New CIS Web Site
The new College website was launched in January. In line with that effort, Elizabeth Hodas led a team within CIS that developed a new CIS site. It emphasizes simplicity and is designed to help us keep information accurate and up to date.  Since January we have made a couple of important additions.  We now have a “top IT Projects” page, which lists the status of our most important projects and will receive at least quarterly updates. And we also have a rapidly developing “service catalog” page which will list all of the services we provide, with information about how to request them.  Take a look at http://www.hmc.edu/cis

Top IT Projects
Our Top IT Projects page https://www.hmc.edu/cis/it-projects/ is intended to give you an overview of our top projects, even though it is a subset of the 50 or so projects that we have in the pipeline at any time.  The CIS Management Team (CIO + four Directors) chose these projects as the “top” ones by considering such things as importance to the community, impact and cost & effort required.  We review this list on a regular basis, with each project owner giving an update on status at least once per quarter.  Early feedback has been positive; it included suggestions that we avoid acronyms and be more specific in places. We’d love to hear  your feedback too.

Educational Technology
We have reorganized a little in CIS in order to focus even more on Educational Technology, shifting the responsibility for everyday AV operations to the User Support Team.  This is a natural progression from the creation of an Educational Technology Group in 2009, originally funded by the Fletcher Jones Foundation.  Elizabeth Hodas has been taking the group through some online professional development experiences, which will help shape future work.  In the coming year, we anticipate a collaboration with the Claremont Libraries around digital badges; we are looking at video over IP solutions and there is rumor that we will have access to a Perceptive Pixel.  If there is an area of Educational Technology in which you are particularly interested, please make sure to contact Elizabeth about it (ehodas@hmc.edu).

The Computing Committee
The Computing Committee got off to a slow start this year, with only one or two meetings in the Fall, due to some issues with membership and faculty assignments.  But under the intrepid leadership of Rachel Levy, the committee made important contributions in what remained of the year. This year’s committee was Rachel Levy (Chair), Deb Mashek, Weiqing Gu, Tim Hussey, Jacob Bandes-Storch and myself. In the policy arena, the committee reviewed and made significant changes to a draft policy on safeguarding private information and suggested a new statement on incidental personal use. Both are currently under review by Campus Counsel.  The committee sent out a survey requesting feedback and created a mechanism for ongoing feedback to the committee (https://www.formstack.com/forms/hmc-computingcommittee).  It cautioned against asking faculty to complete a long survey to benchmark IT services and provided strong feedback about ways in which we at CIS could improve communications and the quality of service provided through the Footprints Ticket System.  The committee was also instrumental in the design of our efforts for Data Privacy Month (https://www.hmc.edu/cis/dpm/).  We also engaged in vigorus conversation about the role of the committee in IT Governance, which will benefit future instances of the committee. I would like to publicly thank Rachel and the other committee members for a really great year.

Consolidation of web servers
We have started consolidating older web servers such as www2, www3, www4 and www5.  The number of servers proliferated over time to meet different needs, but they have proved somewhat difficult to maintain.  For example, when www4 crashed as part of the Charlie issues we dealt with in January, we were not able to revive it.  So we worked with the seven or so faculty who had material on that server and moved it all.  One of the new destinations is the new Charlie, but in a new, more secure manner that is easier to maintain.  Tad Beckman was one of the people affected by this and the result was some adventures in self publishing.  Read about them at http://www5.hmc.edu/ITNews/?p=2779.

Network Infrastructure work during the summer
At the January Board meeting, the Budget and Financial Planning Committee approved additional IT Infrastructure Funds (ITIF) to undertake a complete rewiring of the two structures that make up the Parsons building (Parsons East and Parsons West).  We will be removing a large amount of unused cable, and recabling the whole building.  We will reduce the number of network closets down to two from six, and make serious improvements in the wireless network, increasing the number of access points from nine to seventy three.  This work will come with some disruption and network downtime unfortunately, but you can’t make an omelette without breaking eggs.  We are working closely with the building occupants on this project.

The summer will also see work on the network in preparation for the new dorm; we will bring online a new fiber connection from Claremont to downtown Los Angeles; and we are researching solutions for more wireless capacity on campus, particularly in the residential areas.

Other topics
People have been asking for more support for Google Apps for Education (g.hmc.edu). So we were delighted by Debra Mashek’s note.  Read more …

Elizabeth Hodas wrote that Sakai will be upgraded to version 2.9 this summer, with a new look and feel being planned.

Several faculty have told me that they were surprised by some of the things they learned when they took the FERPA quiz. Take a few minutes and see how you do yourself.

The CIS staff and I wish you the very best for a busy, but at last celebratory, end of semester.

Adventures in Self Publishing

This is a story in the “when life hands you lemons, make lemonade… ” category.

After we experienced some hardware issues with the Charlie file server, some of the older websites that were published under www4.hmc.edu went offline.  The new version of Charlie did not provide the file system needed by the www4 server, which had been limping along for some time.  So we quickly began to explore ways to host those pages. The inimitable Mitch Shacklett (Director, Systems and Network) came up with a great way to do this, by making a subset of your folders on Charlie visible on the web.  He promises that we will soon have a way to password protect pages being offered in this way too.

One of the people affected by this was Tad Beckman, Professor Emeritus in the Humanities, Social Sciences and the Arts Department.  Tad had a collection of pages that included some essays and lecture notes that were referred to by many people around the internet.  Together we looked at a variety of options to publish this material in a more permanent format.  In the end, Tad found a very interesting solution: he published five eBooks on Amazon’s Kindle Store.  I was intrigued by this idea, and asked Tad a few questions by email:

How did you discover that you could publish on Amazon’s kindle store?

I Google searched self-publishing and Kindle Direct Publishing was one of the sites that came up.

Why did the  Claremont library not want to take your material?

The Claremont Digital Library program seems to be only for faculty works that have already been published somewhere. I was dealing with course notes and unpublished materials.

To whom would the material be of interest?

All of these materials have been on my WebSite from the early 1990s onward. Some were developed for courses I was teaching but others were just pursuing interests of mine. Philosophy students around the country have used my course notes and I’ve had extensive contact with some of them. Students of Native Americans (especially California 4th graders) have used my extensive notes for my freshman course “Indigenous People of the Western US”. I used to interact with parents, students, and teachers quite a bit. In addition, I wrote a whole book about California’s indians (The View from Native California) but failed to finish it when I became department chair for the second time. It wound up on the WebSite. In addition, I put up an article on Martin Heidegger which has been read widely over the internet.

How easy/difficult was it, in your opinion to get this done?

If you already have an Amazon account, it is easy to create an account on Kindle Direct Publishing. If you intend to publish, you can go ahead and fill out the tax-related forms as well. Then you get a “bookshelf” from which you can add new titles. It is very easy to do if you have your material in MS Word format. (I was using Word for MAC 2004 but switched to Word for MAC 2011.) When you add a title, you fill out a longish form with all the vital information — title, subtitle, author, categories, search words, etc. You will do two important things toward the bottom of this form — first, create a cover using their cover-maker (import your own image or leave it without an image) and, second, upload your Word file. After that, you go to a second form where you select a price and authenticate that you have authorship rights. After that, it takes the system about 12 hours to put your book into the store. The book appears on your “bookshelf” and offers several operations that you can perform — like creating an updated version, etc.

The one thing that gave me trouble until I finally figured it out was creating a table of contents that worked on a Kindle or iPad. When you know the magic it is easy in Word. In the MAC version at least, you just insert a “bookmark” over the title of a chapter, essay, etc. Then, in your table, you insert a “hyperlink” to that bookmark. When you are all finished, the table works in the Word version and is taken up by the Kindle-format conversion.

What would you say to fellow faculty about your experience with the Amazon system?

Well, I wanted these materials someplace where people could continue to use them and this looks like a good place. It was a very easy process to convert my Web pages into Word format and then coalesce them into a full document. Most of the time went into proofreading, editing, and making additional text so that the final document would be coherent. In about three weeks, I have created five publications. (You can see them by searching “Tad Beckman” on Amazon.com.) I’ve even sold a few!

Any other comments?

Retirement is great!

——————-
I am grateful to Tad for telling me about this. You can take a look at his new  pages, served from Charlie, at http://pages.hmc.edu/beckman and his Amazon publications can be found at http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=tad%20Beckman

 

 

Google Apps Learning Community

google appsOne of the priorities that came out of the Spring 2013 survey of faculty priorities, was a request for training in Google Apps for Education.  This feedback has come to us through a number of channels, so we are delighted to participate in and support the initiative announced in Debra Mashek’s recent email to faculty and staff, which is the first step in the creation of a “learning community” around Google Apps for Education.  As she was preparing her call for participation, I got the opportunity to share a favorite quote, from an article that Dan Stoebel sent around last year (thanks Dan!):

“A healthy alternative is one that celebrates being an ‘accomplished novice’ who is proud of his or her accomplishments but realizes that he or she is still a novice with respect to most that is knowable and hence actively seeks new learning opportunities.” John D. Bransford and Daniel L. Schwartz, “Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal with Multiple
Implications,” Review of Research in Education, vol. 24, no. 1 (January 1999), pp. 61-100.

What better way to approach a learning opportunity like Google Apps for Education?  If you’re inspired, please visit the form to express interest and preferences by Monday, May 5th  http://tinyurl.com/googleappslearningcommunity

Data Privacy Month (with a painful story about a phone)

messages

Data Privacy Month continues, and this week I have a story that is told to all young system administrators. It’s about what happened when a phone was lost.  Read it, weep… and then go make your phone secure.

Junior system administrators go through many rites of passage. One of them is when, early in their training, they get to spend a whole night in the data center.  This is a way of preparing them for those all  night system upgrades, when they have to  perform at their peak at a time when they are normally asleep. This story is often told during that special training night.

A good data center is cold. You should picture the junior sys admins huddled in their parkas around the back of a server, hoping to get some heat from the exhaust.  Some of them are nodding off.  The hoary senior system admin, noting this, decides it is time to tell the phone story, and fill it with detail, to spark their interest.  System admins are by nature fascinated with details, good at reading and, as a bonus, following, meticulously detailed instructions.  And so the hoary one begins…

“Once upon a time, in a far away College, there was a senior member of the administration, let’s call him VP Terry.  VP Terry had lots of responsibilities and was always on the move.  He had a very expensive and very sophisticated smart phone to help with his work. He used it all the time, for emails, for calendar, for reading documents and even for accessing many of the College databases.”

“VP Terry, just like Marissa Mayer, didn’t have a pin, or any other security, on his phone. It saved him (and her) time every day”.

The hoary senior sys admin paused for effect and noted with satisfaction that the eyes of her audience had grown large.  This bunch would be security conscious!

“And then, one dark day, it happened.  VP Terry mislaid his phone. Possibly at the airport. He didn’t notice it was gone until the end of the 11 hour flight and by then he could not contact the IT folk at his College to see what they could do.  Truth be told, he didn’t even think to do that”.  The eyes got wider.

“Someone sent messages from the phone and it was not returned. So do you know what happened?  Are you ready? Here’s the detail:

  • The cell phone contained a direct link to the college’s database, where confidential information on 40,000 students was stored. The College was obliged by law to notify each and every one of them.  Direct cost: $150,000.  Indirect reputation cost: ???
  • The cell phone provided unauthorized access to educational records (grades were accessible from the phone).  Student’s privacy rights were so compromised that it warranted a self-report to the Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO) of the Department of Education, placing future funding for the College at risk.
  • A document containing a job offer was viewable on the phone and ended up on the internet.  The candidate turned the College down and was gravely embarrassed at her home institution.
  • VP Terry’s personal credit card information was compromised.
  • He lost all the photos of his family vacations, since he was no better at backups than he was at security.”

As she listed these  details, the hoary sys admin’s voice reached a crescendo.  The junior sys admins were now fully awake and several pulled out their smart phones, sheepishly looking for the settings…

Thanks for reading. Please have a look at this Intel site on mobile security:

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/security/mobile-security.html

Then go forth and put some security on your phones!

Call for Papers in Digital Humanities

From the digital humanist listserv….
Eiffel Tower by Damien Vassart
Second Call For Papers Human-Computer Interaction, HCI, is a symposium in the 18th International Conference Information Visualisation, 15, 16, 17 and 18 July 2014, University of Paris Descartes, Paris, France. http://www.graphicslink.co.uk/IV2014/ Click on Symposia hypertext

Important Dates: 01 March 2014: Submission of papers 25 April 2014: Notification of Peer Review Result 10 May 2014: Submission of camera-ready 15 May 2014: Early registration closes Paper Format Guide: (Not more than 6 pages – excess pages at 30 GBP per page.) http://www.graphicslink.co.uk/IV2014/INSTRUCTION.htm

The Humanities has enjoyed a renaissance in the last two decades. This has been largely facilitated by the acceptance of digital media as a tool for the critical analysis of scholarly works. This new field, the Digital Humanities, includes applied and theoretical use of digital media. Increasingly, large collections of data are being investigated using digital tools. These tools assist in visualising the information contained in ways that expose new meanings and interpretations of scholarly knowledge. Our host, the International Information Visualisation Conference, provides a uniquely propitious environment for a Digital Humanities symposium. With other symposia spanning Information Visualisation Theory & Practice to Visualisation in Software Engineering, attendees of the Digital Humanities Knowledge Visualisation symposium are well placed to make serendipitous connections with technologists in relevant fields. This symposium seeks short and long papers on original and unpublished work addressing, but not limited to, the following topics: * Culture and Heritage Knowledge Visualisation * Art and Design * Visualization techniques for text corpora * Cartographics * Virtual and built environments * Interactive systems * Infographic design and its associated process * Data mining in the humanities * Information design and modelling * Social Networks * Network graph visualisation of historical precedents * Digital media enabled humanities research * Digital media assisted linguistics research * The digital arts, architecture, music, film, theatre, new media, digital games, and related areas Symposium Digital Humanities Knowledge Visualisation

Liaison: Theodor G Wyeld, Flinders University, Australia Symposium Committee Theodor G Wyeld, Flinders University, Australia (Chair) Sarah Kenderdine, City University of Hong Kong (co-Chair) Francis T. Marchese, Pace University, NY, USA (co-Chair) Advisory, Programme and reviewing committee: Theodor G Wyeld (Flinders University, Aust) Sarah Kenderdine (Museum Victoria, Aust) Francis T. Marchese (Pace University, NY, USA) Ekaterina Prasolova-Førland (NTNU, Trondheim, Norg) Teng-Wen Chang (NYUST, Taiwan) Brett Leavy (CyberDreaming, Aust) Malcolm Pumpa (QUT, Aust) Marinos Ioannides (HTI, Cyprus) Giovanni Issini (DFI, Italy) Special Journal Edition for selected papers: TBA. Supporting Bodies: Flinders Institute for Research in the Humanities, Flinders University, Australia Museum Victoria, Melbourne, Australia City University of Hong Kong Pace University, NY, USA

HOST: http://www.graphicslink.co.uk/IV2014/ All enquiries about Digital Humanities Knowledge Visualization should be addressed to: Theodor Wyeld Screen and Media Flinders University GPO Box 2100 Adelaide 5001 South Australia ph: +06 8 8201 3508 fx: +06 8 8201 3635 em: theodor.wyeld@flinders.edu.au wb: www.flinders.edu.au/people/theodor.wyeld URL: http://www.graphicslink.co.uk/IV2014/DHKV.htm

Data Privacy Month (with a painful story about file permissions)

January 28th kicked off Data Privacy Month.  CIS is marking the month by reminding you that data privacy is everyone’s responsibility. Here is a second true story culled from the vaults of HMC server administrator lore. Some details have been changed. Read it, weep… and then check your folder and file permissions.

Agnes and students-l are not involved.

So there once was a professor, let’s call him Dr. Linus Windonmax. He was a professor of linguistics in the Humanities Division of a large state university. (Not all of the HMC server administrator lore is actually about HMC.  Server admins sometimes talk to other server admins around water coolers or campfires).  LWM, as his students called him, was a careful and detail oriented person who always read every word of every email sent to him by his local IT unit.  This in itself marked him as a rare bird, since not even the IT folk read every word of every email, especially not the ones they wrote.  But I digress.

LWM had read and carefully followed instructions about how to store files on the file server.  He wanted to keep his work for posterity and he knew that files on the file server were backed up and stored off site, unlike things he stored on his local hard drive. So he had gotten into the habit of stashing his stuff on “charlie”, as the file server was affectionately called.  Only hoary server admins knew why, and no one wanted to be considered hoary.

One day, as LWM ambled to class, his colleague Wilma waved and smiled.  “LWM, congratulations on selling the house”.  Linus politely smiled back; in fact he bared his newly polished teeth to hide his mortification.  For he hadn’t told anyone on campus about the house. In class, a few of his students made arch mention of pajamas and champagne. More mortification: it seemed they knew about his little soiree to celebrate the house sale. Hmm. not good, not good.

Later that afternoon, as the still agitated professor sat in front of his widescreen monitor, it suddenly struck LWM  that someone must have been looking at his files. He’d stored copies of all of the house sale documents and the “pajamas and champagne” party photos on Charlie, as was his wont. He sprinted over to the IT Help Desk to demand an explanation.

The friendly folk at the Help Desk had to work hard to explain the situation to LWM, especially since the server admins were still deep in the long dark teatime of the soul, dealing with students-l problems. In a nutshell, it went like this. No one could actually see LWM’s files, except LWM himself and two server admins of high integrity (definitely not hoary).  But everyone who had an account on Charlie could see the names of his files and browse through his folders looking at how they were organized. That, said the helpful help desk staffer, was a result of the “file permissions”, which determine who has access to a file or folder and what kind of access they have (see file names, open files, edit files, delete…). Most users can change their own file permissions, and over time, the result of choices by users and server admins had resulted in the mortification of LWM.

Coming back now to HMC, the file permissions on Charlie and Alice are not very consistent, and we have had situations in which file names were visible in ways that people did not intend.  This is the result of myriad choices over the years by both users and server admins. And the only really safe way for us to be sure that permissions are correct is to ask you to check them.  So, during data privacy month, perhaps you can take a few minutes to do so?  You can double check your file permissions easily enough.from a Windows computer.  Here are instructions (requires HMC Credentials).

It’s everyone’s responsibility to ensure data privacy. During Data Privacy Month, please make protecting privacy and data a greater priority. Thanks for reading. Now go forth and check your file permissions.

Room reservation software upgrade to EMS Campus

Guest author, Isabel Jordan, wrote for us about a recent upgrade to the Event Management System….

HMC’s reservation software, Event Management System (EMS), has been upgraded to the Campus 3.0 version. Virtual EMS was only changed in appearance but not use. There has been some feedback from Mac users who say they are having difficulty viewing Virtual EMS. The solution has been to use Google Chrome
as the browser rather than Mozilla Firefox.

Currently, CIS and the Facilities & Maintenance team are working together to
get the Integrated Authentication module up and running. This module will
integrate EMS with the directory server so that one can log in to EMS with
the same account log in/password that is used to log in to one’s computer
(HMC credentials).  There are over 600 users who have accounts in EMS so we
are trying to figure out the most efficient way to make this happen.

Moving forward the plan is to install an Academic Planning Module that will
assist the Registrar’s office to connect the academic schedule from CX to
EMS. Currently the 5C registrars are being trained to learn the
collaboration between CX and EMS.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships

Another interesting post from a listserv:

The American Council of Learned Societies invites application for the
sixth annual competition of the Digital Innovation Fellowships.

This program supports digitally based research projects in all
disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences.
It is hoped that projects of successful applicants will help advance
digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature
and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating such
works.

ACLS will award up to six ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships in this
competition year, including one project on which two scholars are
collaborating.

Stipends up to $60,000
Project costs up to $25,000

Deadline: September 29, 2010.

For more information visit: http://www.acls.org/programs/digital/

During the 2009-10 cycle, ACLS awarded over $15 million to more than 380
scholars based in the US and abroad working in the humanities and
related social sciences.  Visit the Fellows & Research section to view
recent awardee http://www.acls.org/research/digital.aspx?id=798
listings and profiles.

American Council of Learned Societies
633 Third Avenue
New York, NY 10017
fellowships@acls.org<mailto:fellowships@acls.org>
__________________________________
Steven C. Wheatley
Vice President
American Council of Learned Societies
633 Third Avenue
New York, New York 10017-6795
tel:  212 697 1505, ext. 128  fax: 212 949 8058
swheatley@acls.org<mailto:swheatley@acls.org>
www.acls.org http://www.acls.org